• TechKnow - Deep sea gold rush

    Oceans cover 70 percent of the earth's surface, but only a fraction of the undersea world has been explored. On this episode of TechKnow, Phil Torres joins a team of scientists on a special expedition to explore and uncover the mysteries at the bottom of the ocean floor. "What we are doing is similar to astronauts and planetary scientists just trying to study life on another planet," says Beth Orcutt, a senior research scientist. The journey begins in Costa Rica aboard the R/V Atlantis, a research vessel operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. From there, Phil gets the chance to take a dive with Alvin, a deep-water submersible capable of taking explorers down to 6,000 metres (20,000 feet) under the sea. Commissioned in 1964, Alvin has a celebrated history, locating an une...

    published: 27 Dec 2015
  • Scientists fear deep-sea mining

    Scientists fear that even before one of the last frontiers of exploration, the ocean deep, has been properly studied it will already have been exploited by commercial deep-sea mining looking for rare euronews knowledge brings you a fresh mix of the world's most interesting know-hows, directly from space and sci-tech experts. Subscribe for your dose of space and sci-tech: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=euronewsknowledge Made by euronews, the most watched news channel in Europe.

    published: 06 Sep 2016
  • Under Pressure: Deep Sea Minerals in the Pacific

    Several Pacific Island nations are eagerly eyeing up the potential economic benefits from valuable deep sea mineral resources that have been discovered within their maritime territories. With a recent surge in commercial interest the Pacific has now become the centre of an international debate over whether the sustainable economic benefits for Pacific Islanders will outweigh the environmental risks of harvesting these precious metals from the bottom of the sea. This short film examines the issue from a number of key perspectives including; anti-deep sea mining NGO's; politicians; government agencies; deep sea mining companies and; the Secretariat of the Pacific Community.

    published: 20 Jul 2013
  • How a Canadian company will mine the sea bed near Papua New Guinea

    Canadian mining company Nautilus Minerals has reached an agreement with the government of Papua New Guinea to begin mining an area of seabed believed to be rich in gold and copper ores, according to the BBC. Under the terms of the agreement, Papua New Guinea will contribute $120 million to the operation and receive a 15 percent share in the mine. Environmentalists say the mine will devastate the area and cause long-lasting damage to the environment. The BBC reports that "the mine will target an area of hydrothermal vents where superheated, highly acidic water emerges from the seabed, where it encounters far colder and more alkaline seawater, forcing it to deposit high concentrations of minerals." The report continues: The result is that the seabed is formed of ores that are far ric...

    published: 07 Jun 2014
  • ENS351 Deep Sea Mining

    Description

    published: 06 Apr 2015
  • 12 Most Amazing Deep Water Facts

    The ocean is a deeply mystical , beautifully breathtaking, perfect place. But it does come with some downsides. Here are 12 Magnificent Deep Water Facts Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 5.Wow, That’s Hot Because the seafloor lies on top of the layer in the Earth’s crust where magma is made, certain parts of it contain hydrothermal vents. Such vents are a scientific result of lava erupting from the sea floor, and they are typically found near underwater volcanoes. These vents aren’t like those of your typical jacuzzi tub vents- they can reach temperatures up to six hundred and sixty two degrees high- enough to melt led. These could create problems for deep water explorers, but oceanographers are able to get an idea of where the vents are located through the hot water plumes tha...

    published: 12 Jun 2017
  • The Next Frontier in Mining: Deep Sea Exploitation in the Pacific

    The ocean has a wealth of resources. From food, to travel, to pharmaceutical needs, and to energy, the ocean has always provided for mankind. And now, mankind is turning to the ocean for minerals and metals needed for the technology we use in our everyday lives. An exploration into the emerging industry of deep sea mining leads to more questions than answers. Read more: http://pulitzercenter.org/projects/underwater-mining-pacific-ocean

    published: 14 Dec 2016
  • Deep Ocean Mining: The New Frontier

    http://www.kitco.com - David Heydon, Founder & Chairman of DeepGreen Resources, discusses the brave new world of deep ocean mining in international waters. Underwater mineral findings include copper, nickel, cobalt and manganese, and Heydon discusses both the efficiencies and difficulties of this new method of mining. For more exclusive PDAC coverage visit http://www.kitco.com/pdac Join the discussion @ the Kitco Forums - http://www.kitcomm.com Follow us on twitter @ http://www.twitter.com/kitconewsnow Connect w/ Kitco News on Facebook - http://on.fb.me/hr3FdK Send your feedback to newsfeedback@kitco.com http://www.kitco.com --- Agree? Disagree? Join the conversation @ The Kitco Forums and be part of the premier online community for precious metals investors: http://kitco...

    published: 18 Mar 2011
  • Drilling The Sea for Oil - Deep Sea Drillers

    Drilling The Sea for Oil - Deep Sea Drillers dee sea drilling - Results - North Sea (body Of Water) - Infoos stranded deep beta, Stranded Deep Turtle, Stranded Deep Reef Shark, Stranded Deep Stingray Explaining the steps in the deep sea drilling process Deep Sea Drilling Platform, Vector - Stock Vector from the largest library of royalty-free images, only at Shutterstock to take steps to protect New Zealand from another shipping accident like the Rena, and in allowing deep sea drilling oil spills are more likely Explore Stephanie Harris's board "Deep Sea Drilling NZ" on Pinterest, the world's catalog of ideas Deep sea drilling companies are finally having a good day, anyone know why ken sea drill part 1. prohibit deep sea oil drilling;.. (Organism Classification),Northumberland (E...

    published: 02 Dec 2016
  • Deep-sea mining could transform the globe

    Gold alone found on the sea floor is estimated to be worth $150 trn. But the cost to the planet of extracting it could be severe. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist

    published: 25 Apr 2017
  • Destroying the Oceans, World’s First Deep Sea Mining Venture

    The world’s first deep-sea mining operation will kick off in early 2019 when a Canadian firm, Nautilus Minerals Inc., lowers a trio of massive remote-controlled mining robots to the floor of the Bismarck Sea off the coast of Papua New Guinea in pursuit of rich copper and gold reserves.

    published: 26 Mar 2017
  • Nautilus Animated Industrial.mp4

    Nautilus Animated Industrial that shows a sterilized version of the Deep Sea mining process.

    published: 01 Oct 2011
  • Blue Ocean Minerals - 5 - THERE IS NO COMPARISON

    http://www.blueoceanminerals.com/. There is no tenable source of mineral on the Planet that compares with the origin, full-spectrum and natural chemistry of ocean-derived Blue Ocean Minerals. Scientific discussion comparing other sources.

    published: 10 Apr 2011
  • Black Smokers: Ore Factories of the Deep

    BLACK SMOKERS: ORE FACTORIES OF THE DEEP At the bottom of the sea, in a depth of several thousand metres, black smokers bring up valuable raw materials from inside the earth. Their metre-high vents seem to give off smoke like under water industrial chimneys. CAMERA Maike Nicolai, GEOMAR Hannes Huusmann, GEOMAR ROV-Team, GEOMAR NARRATION Martin Heckmann GEOMAR | Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel

    published: 23 May 2012
  • 12 Bizarre Things Found in the Deep Sea

    From strange-looking sea creatures that look like funnels to underwater plane wrecks that serve as a playground for the fishes. Subscribe for new videos weekly! 7. A New Pufferfish Researchers have managed to recently figure out the answer to a 20-year-old mystery under the ocean while discovering a new fish. There were these intricate circles with geometric designs that were being created and no one had any logical reason as to how these designs were being made. These “underwater” crop circles are located on the seafloor by the coast of Amami-Ōshima Island. Turns out the circles aren’t actually circles, but really they’re nests with double edges that are made by this new species of pufferfish as a way to protect their eggs from harsh ocean currents and maybe even predators as well. The...

    published: 01 Aug 2016
  • UK firm in deep sea mining plan for minerals

    A British company has announced that it is planning to exploit a new and controversial frontier in the search for valuable minerals, by mining the sea bed in the Pacific Ocean. UK Seabed Resources, a subsidiary of the British arm of Lockheed Martin, hopes to extract so-called nodules - small lumps of rock - from the ocean floor. High prices for copper, gold and rare earth minerals, all vital for modern electronics, have triggered a rush to find new sources.

    published: 14 Mar 2013
TechKnow - Deep sea gold rush

TechKnow - Deep sea gold rush

  • Order:
  • Duration: 23:43
  • Updated: 27 Dec 2015
  • views: 15218
videos
Oceans cover 70 percent of the earth's surface, but only a fraction of the undersea world has been explored. On this episode of TechKnow, Phil Torres joins a team of scientists on a special expedition to explore and uncover the mysteries at the bottom of the ocean floor. "What we are doing is similar to astronauts and planetary scientists just trying to study life on another planet," says Beth Orcutt, a senior research scientist. The journey begins in Costa Rica aboard the R/V Atlantis, a research vessel operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. From there, Phil gets the chance to take a dive with Alvin, a deep-water submersible capable of taking explorers down to 6,000 metres (20,000 feet) under the sea. Commissioned in 1964, Alvin has a celebrated history, locating an unexploded hydrogen bomb off the coast of Spain and exploring the famous RMS Titanic in the 1980s. Alvin and its first female pilot, Cindy Van Dover, were the first to discover hydrothermal vents, which are underwater springs where plumes of black smoke and water pour out from underneath the earth's crust. The vents were inhabited by previously unknown organisms that thrived in the absence of sunlight. After 40 years of exploration, Alvin got a high-tech upgrade. The storied submersible is now outfitted with high-resolution cameras to provide a 245-degree viewing field and a robotic arm that scientists can use to pull samples of rock and ocean life to then study back on land. But scientists are not the only ones interested in the ocean. These days the new gold rush is not in the hills, it is in the deep sea. For thousands of years miners have been exploiting the earth in search of precious metals. As resources on dry land are depleted, now the search for new sources of metals and minerals is heading underwater. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's national ocean service estimates that there is more than $150tn in gold waiting to be mined from the floor of the world's oceans. "The industry is moving very, very fast. They have far more financial resources than the scientific community," says Cindy Van Dover, Alvin's first female pilot and Duke University Oceanography Professor. Seabed mining is still in the planning stages, but Nautilus Minerals, a Canadian mining company, says it has the technology and the contracts in place with the island nation of Papua New Guinea to start mining in its waters in about two years. What is the future of seabed mining? And what are the consequences of seabed mining for the marine ecosystems? Can science and industry co-exist and work together on viable and sustainable solutions? - Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check out our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
https://wn.com/Techknow_Deep_Sea_Gold_Rush
Scientists fear deep-sea mining

Scientists fear deep-sea mining

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:01
  • Updated: 06 Sep 2016
  • views: 2919
videos
Scientists fear that even before one of the last frontiers of exploration, the ocean deep, has been properly studied it will already have been exploited by commercial deep-sea mining looking for rare euronews knowledge brings you a fresh mix of the world's most interesting know-hows, directly from space and sci-tech experts. Subscribe for your dose of space and sci-tech: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=euronewsknowledge Made by euronews, the most watched news channel in Europe.
https://wn.com/Scientists_Fear_Deep_Sea_Mining
Under Pressure: Deep Sea Minerals in the Pacific

Under Pressure: Deep Sea Minerals in the Pacific

  • Order:
  • Duration: 24:57
  • Updated: 20 Jul 2013
  • views: 9953
videos
Several Pacific Island nations are eagerly eyeing up the potential economic benefits from valuable deep sea mineral resources that have been discovered within their maritime territories. With a recent surge in commercial interest the Pacific has now become the centre of an international debate over whether the sustainable economic benefits for Pacific Islanders will outweigh the environmental risks of harvesting these precious metals from the bottom of the sea. This short film examines the issue from a number of key perspectives including; anti-deep sea mining NGO's; politicians; government agencies; deep sea mining companies and; the Secretariat of the Pacific Community.
https://wn.com/Under_Pressure_Deep_Sea_Minerals_In_The_Pacific
How a Canadian company will mine the sea bed near Papua New Guinea

How a Canadian company will mine the sea bed near Papua New Guinea

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:12
  • Updated: 07 Jun 2014
  • views: 21229
videos
Canadian mining company Nautilus Minerals has reached an agreement with the government of Papua New Guinea to begin mining an area of seabed believed to be rich in gold and copper ores, according to the BBC. Under the terms of the agreement, Papua New Guinea will contribute $120 million to the operation and receive a 15 percent share in the mine. Environmentalists say the mine will devastate the area and cause long-lasting damage to the environment. The BBC reports that "the mine will target an area of hydrothermal vents where superheated, highly acidic water emerges from the seabed, where it encounters far colder and more alkaline seawater, forcing it to deposit high concentrations of minerals." The report continues: The result is that the seabed is formed of ores that are far richer in gold and copper than ores found on land. Mike Johnston, chief executive of Nautilus Minerals told the BBC "that a temperature probe left in place for 18 months was found to have 'high grade copper all over it'." Nautilus announced in April that it had completed its bulk cutter, the first component of its Seafloor Production Tools system, which will be used to mine the seabed. Nautilus also approximately 500,000 square kilometres of "highly prospective exploration acreage" in Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Fiji, Vanuatu and Tonga, as well as in international waters in the eastern Pacific, the company said in a press release.
https://wn.com/How_A_Canadian_Company_Will_Mine_The_Sea_Bed_Near_Papua_New_Guinea
ENS351 Deep Sea Mining

ENS351 Deep Sea Mining

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:06
  • Updated: 06 Apr 2015
  • views: 3405
videos https://wn.com/Ens351_Deep_Sea_Mining
12 Most Amazing Deep Water Facts

12 Most Amazing Deep Water Facts

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:46
  • Updated: 12 Jun 2017
  • views: 71585
videos
The ocean is a deeply mystical , beautifully breathtaking, perfect place. But it does come with some downsides. Here are 12 Magnificent Deep Water Facts Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 5.Wow, That’s Hot Because the seafloor lies on top of the layer in the Earth’s crust where magma is made, certain parts of it contain hydrothermal vents. Such vents are a scientific result of lava erupting from the sea floor, and they are typically found near underwater volcanoes. These vents aren’t like those of your typical jacuzzi tub vents- they can reach temperatures up to six hundred and sixty two degrees high- enough to melt led. These could create problems for deep water explorers, but oceanographers are able to get an idea of where the vents are located through the hot water plumes that arise into the sea. While it’s wondrous to think about these vents, it’s also fascinating to know that they play a part in keeping the ocean’s ecosystem healthy. The high temperatures of the water aid in removing chemical compounds from the water, like magnesium and sulfate. 4. Marine Mining An exciting type of robot has been developed in order to mine precious metals like gold, copper, manganese, and others from the bottom of the sea floor. There are both positive and negative effects to these seafloor mining robots, developed by Canadian Mining firm Nautilus Minerals. On the plus side, they could prevent us from continuing to deplete our natural resources and lead us to the development of more eco friendly technology. However, there is rising concern that they will disrupt ecosystems of the ocean. These things will definitely have no problem sinking to the ground, as they are reportedly 200 tons each and the size of a “small house”. Things like population growth have led analysts to believe that human society will have a vastly greater need for metals in future years, but environmentalists are fervently against it. Some scientists have even raised concerns that the mining vehicles may accidentally upturn dangerous deep sea floor sediments , and that harmful chemicals could end up in the waves of populated beaches. They aren’t set to launch until 2019, so if you are in favor or in protest, speak now or forever hold your peace! 3.Gold Rush Maybe the idea of mining at the bottom of the ocean isn’t such a bad idea after all. Research by the National Ocean Service may just hold more than twenty million tons of dissolved and undissolved gold. They added that if all the gold in the world’s oceans was successfully mined, every one would have nine whole pounds of gold. That seems pretty insane, but it may not be worth it. The gold is so diluted that for every litre of seawater, there is thirteen billionths of gold in it. Pretty tiny, wouldn’t you agree? Miners would have to travel two miles underwater, and on top of that, dig even deeper into the rocks of the ocean floor. 2.Embrace the Darkness Because the light of the sun can “only penetrate about three hundred thirty feet” into the surface of the ocean, much of the remains in total darkness. And, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, sunlight can only travel down as deep as six hundred feet. As a result, our twelve thousand and four hundred feet deep oceans are in a state of sort of terrifying darkness. As in, there are “definitely no light bulbs or candles to light down there darkness”. Which basically means that most of our planet is actually dark all of the time. One of the darkest zones of the ocean is the aphotic, of “midnight” zone. It lies only three thousand two hundred and eighty feet below sea level, which really doesn’t seem like that much, because it’s around equal to a sixth of a mile. We hope you’ve enjoyed- swimming- around in all this ocean knowledge, but we really enjoy your comments! Here are just a few from today. We’ll keep -fishing- for them…. 1.Watch Out For That Water The ocean is a deeply mystical , beautifully breathtaking, perfect place. But it does come with some downsides. Every year, tons and tons of human waste gets dumped into the ocean. Containments of this waste range anywhere from empty bottles to infected needles-ew! What’s more, is that cruise ships are responsible for dumping over one BILLION gallons of sewage into the ocean every year. The fact of the matter is, is that the ocean is FILLED with millions of disease causing microbes and bacteria. How much bacteria, may you ask? Er, just a tinge- if you consider 10 to 100 million viruses per teaspoon of ocean water a tinge. Although the ocean’s ecosystem has a natural way of cleansing itself, studies have shown more and more disease causing agents are in our Earth’s water. Such things can contaminate fish, which can eventually harm humans if consumed. The point is, we should all work to keep our oceans clean and safe!
https://wn.com/12_Most_Amazing_Deep_Water_Facts
The Next Frontier in Mining: Deep Sea Exploitation in the Pacific

The Next Frontier in Mining: Deep Sea Exploitation in the Pacific

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:45
  • Updated: 14 Dec 2016
  • views: 405
videos
The ocean has a wealth of resources. From food, to travel, to pharmaceutical needs, and to energy, the ocean has always provided for mankind. And now, mankind is turning to the ocean for minerals and metals needed for the technology we use in our everyday lives. An exploration into the emerging industry of deep sea mining leads to more questions than answers. Read more: http://pulitzercenter.org/projects/underwater-mining-pacific-ocean
https://wn.com/The_Next_Frontier_In_Mining_Deep_Sea_Exploitation_In_The_Pacific
Deep Ocean Mining: The New Frontier

Deep Ocean Mining: The New Frontier

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:29
  • Updated: 18 Mar 2011
  • views: 5757
videos
http://www.kitco.com - David Heydon, Founder & Chairman of DeepGreen Resources, discusses the brave new world of deep ocean mining in international waters. Underwater mineral findings include copper, nickel, cobalt and manganese, and Heydon discusses both the efficiencies and difficulties of this new method of mining. For more exclusive PDAC coverage visit http://www.kitco.com/pdac Join the discussion @ the Kitco Forums - http://www.kitcomm.com Follow us on twitter @ http://www.twitter.com/kitconewsnow Connect w/ Kitco News on Facebook - http://on.fb.me/hr3FdK Send your feedback to newsfeedback@kitco.com http://www.kitco.com --- Agree? Disagree? Join the conversation @ The Kitco Forums and be part of the premier online community for precious metals investors: http://kitcomm.com -- Or join the conversation on social media: @KitcoNewsNOW on Twitter: http://twitter.com/kitconews --- Kitco News on Facebook: http://facebook.com/kitconews
https://wn.com/Deep_Ocean_Mining_The_New_Frontier
Drilling The Sea for Oil - Deep Sea Drillers

Drilling The Sea for Oil - Deep Sea Drillers

  • Order:
  • Duration: 47:13
  • Updated: 02 Dec 2016
  • views: 14097
videos
Drilling The Sea for Oil - Deep Sea Drillers dee sea drilling - Results - North Sea (body Of Water) - Infoos stranded deep beta, Stranded Deep Turtle, Stranded Deep Reef Shark, Stranded Deep Stingray Explaining the steps in the deep sea drilling process Deep Sea Drilling Platform, Vector - Stock Vector from the largest library of royalty-free images, only at Shutterstock to take steps to protect New Zealand from another shipping accident like the Rena, and in allowing deep sea drilling oil spills are more likely Explore Stephanie Harris's board "Deep Sea Drilling NZ" on Pinterest, the world's catalog of ideas Deep sea drilling companies are finally having a good day, anyone know why ken sea drill part 1. prohibit deep sea oil drilling;.. (Organism Classification),Northumberland (English Non-metropolitan County),drills,practice,ben,bburville,North Sea (Body Of Water) shark, shelter, stranded deep alpha, castaway, gameplay, stranded deep beta, Stranded Deep Turtle, Stranded Deep Reef Shark, Stranded Deep Stingray Below are more detailed explanations for each step of the deep sea drilling process China's large homegrown deep sea drilling platform 981 Download and use this Deep Sea Drilling Oil Rig Pumps Oil To Land Processing Facility clipart in your School Projects, Powerpoints and More Causes a leak or spill Its good to do business in New Zealand and a Deep sea drilling NZ Petroleum & Minerals Land based drilling companies focused on shale oil well drilling will fare much better than deep sea drilling companies in my opinion Helicopters,H225,Oil & Gas,OG,Recue,Training,Rescue (Profession),Bristow Helicopters (Airline),North Sea (Body Of Water),EC225 of Doom, Stranded Deep gameplay, Stranded Deep Turtle, Stranded Deep Reef Shark, Stranded Deep Stingray, Stranded Deep Door, Stranded Deep Plane The BOP is a vital part of the deep sea drilling process, and it is this function that can prevent accidents or unnecessary danger from occurring Type: Deep sea drilling platform 34 Finally, in May 2014, CNOOC unilaterally placed a deep sea drilling oil rig in gas producers and deep sea drilling companies like Karoon Gas, I'm looking at you Drilling The Sea for Oil - Deep Sea Drillers
https://wn.com/Drilling_The_Sea_For_Oil_Deep_Sea_Drillers
Deep-sea mining could transform the globe

Deep-sea mining could transform the globe

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:33
  • Updated: 25 Apr 2017
  • views: 22495
videos
Gold alone found on the sea floor is estimated to be worth $150 trn. But the cost to the planet of extracting it could be severe. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Mining_Could_Transform_The_Globe
Destroying the Oceans, World’s First Deep Sea Mining Venture

Destroying the Oceans, World’s First Deep Sea Mining Venture

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:13
  • Updated: 26 Mar 2017
  • views: 1866
videos
The world’s first deep-sea mining operation will kick off in early 2019 when a Canadian firm, Nautilus Minerals Inc., lowers a trio of massive remote-controlled mining robots to the floor of the Bismarck Sea off the coast of Papua New Guinea in pursuit of rich copper and gold reserves.
https://wn.com/Destroying_The_Oceans,_World’S_First_Deep_Sea_Mining_Venture
Nautilus Animated Industrial.mp4

Nautilus Animated Industrial.mp4

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:16
  • Updated: 01 Oct 2011
  • views: 22555
videos
Nautilus Animated Industrial that shows a sterilized version of the Deep Sea mining process.
https://wn.com/Nautilus_Animated_Industrial.Mp4
Blue Ocean Minerals - 5 - THERE IS NO COMPARISON

Blue Ocean Minerals - 5 - THERE IS NO COMPARISON

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:21
  • Updated: 10 Apr 2011
  • views: 1040
videos
http://www.blueoceanminerals.com/. There is no tenable source of mineral on the Planet that compares with the origin, full-spectrum and natural chemistry of ocean-derived Blue Ocean Minerals. Scientific discussion comparing other sources.
https://wn.com/Blue_Ocean_Minerals_5_There_Is_No_Comparison
Black Smokers: Ore Factories of the Deep

Black Smokers: Ore Factories of the Deep

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:25
  • Updated: 23 May 2012
  • views: 27034
videos
BLACK SMOKERS: ORE FACTORIES OF THE DEEP At the bottom of the sea, in a depth of several thousand metres, black smokers bring up valuable raw materials from inside the earth. Their metre-high vents seem to give off smoke like under water industrial chimneys. CAMERA Maike Nicolai, GEOMAR Hannes Huusmann, GEOMAR ROV-Team, GEOMAR NARRATION Martin Heckmann GEOMAR | Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel
https://wn.com/Black_Smokers_Ore_Factories_Of_The_Deep
12 Bizarre Things Found in the Deep Sea

12 Bizarre Things Found in the Deep Sea

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:18
  • Updated: 01 Aug 2016
  • views: 176906
videos
From strange-looking sea creatures that look like funnels to underwater plane wrecks that serve as a playground for the fishes. Subscribe for new videos weekly! 7. A New Pufferfish Researchers have managed to recently figure out the answer to a 20-year-old mystery under the ocean while discovering a new fish. There were these intricate circles with geometric designs that were being created and no one had any logical reason as to how these designs were being made. These “underwater” crop circles are located on the seafloor by the coast of Amami-Ōshima Island. Turns out the circles aren’t actually circles, but really they’re nests with double edges that are made by this new species of pufferfish as a way to protect their eggs from harsh ocean currents and maybe even predators as well. The males are the ones who construct the nest by swimming and wriggling back and forth in the sand in order to attract a female during mating season. Yoji Okata was the first to witness this and soon after a team of ichthyologists went out on an expedition along with a tv crew to capture the whole thing on film. 6. A New Sea Slug This new species of sea slug was discovered last year near the Japanese Islands and measures in at about an inch long, give or take. The slug is considered as a “missing link” between sea slugs that feast on hydroids and those that happen to feed on corals. The photogenic gastropod’s elegant lines and beautifully bright coloration make them wondrous beauties of the deep. The newly identified slug which when photographed is captured in shades of blue, red and gold, also helps in having a better knowledge of the dawning of an unusual symbiosis in other species in the same genus. Relatives of the sea slugs have multi-branched guts in which algae called zooxanthellae reside. The algae have a symbiotic relationship with the coral that the sea slug eats and once ingested, the algae then begin to create essential nutrients for its host, the sea slug. 5. An Underwater Playground What was once a transporter airplane that flew the skies during the second World War, now lies at the bottom of the ocean as a relic. But that is just how we see it. The skeleton of the airplane has merged with the ocean’s delicate ecosystem and now serves as a home to tropical fish, shrimps, and other types of sea creatures. The Douglas Dakota DC-3 was once used by the Turkish and was deliberately sent to the bottom of the ocean at 21 meters way back in July of 2009 in order to create a sort of “underwater playground” for divers from all over. An underwater photographer named Andrey Nekrasov dived down to the wreckage with a group of other divers and stated that the plane was “unusual and beautiful” and “being in great condition”. Many of the divers had trouble reaching the airplane and it took them various tries to reach it. They needed to resurface for air every 2 minutes. 3. A Deep Sea “Graveyard” Between the years of 2008 and 2010, there were four large carcasses of marine creatures discovered on the ocean floor. These large animals were later identified as being the bodies of 1 whale shark and three rays. Footage recorded from ROVs or remotely operated vehicles were able to show the interesting inner workings of how these decaying corpses of fallen animals can serve as complex ecosystems towards populations of smaller creatures and maybe even able to sustain them. They reported around 50 scavenging fish near each of the carcasses while also witnessing eelpouts waiting for smaller scavengers to come by and then consume them. 2. An Alien-like Jellyfish This other-worldly looking creature was discovered back in April of this year just near the Mariana Trench, that is located in between Japan and the Philippines deep within the Pacific Ocean, on the Enigma Seamount. The jellyfish was seen 2.3 miles just below the surface of the ocean by the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research. It can be seen as having two sets of tentacles, one being much larger and the other being shorter. 1. The Ghost Octopus This interesting little octopod was discovered earlier this year back in March. The ghost octopus is believed to be the deepest dwelling octopod that doesn’t have any fins, unlike other species of deep dwelling octopods such as the “dumbo” octopus. The discovery of this new creature took place not too far off from where the Hawaiian archipelago is located. Pale in color due to the lack of pigment because it lives in the dark depths, the ghost octopus doesn’t show much muscle definition like other octopi, instead, it appears rather gelatinous in form. Not much else is known about these creatures as they’re still relatively new.
https://wn.com/12_Bizarre_Things_Found_In_The_Deep_Sea
UK firm in deep sea mining plan for minerals

UK firm in deep sea mining plan for minerals

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:54
  • Updated: 14 Mar 2013
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A British company has announced that it is planning to exploit a new and controversial frontier in the search for valuable minerals, by mining the sea bed in the Pacific Ocean. UK Seabed Resources, a subsidiary of the British arm of Lockheed Martin, hopes to extract so-called nodules - small lumps of rock - from the ocean floor. High prices for copper, gold and rare earth minerals, all vital for modern electronics, have triggered a rush to find new sources.
https://wn.com/UK_Firm_In_Deep_Sea_Mining_Plan_For_Minerals
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