• TechKnow - Deep sea gold rush

    Oceans cover 70 percent of the earth's surface, but only a fraction of the undersea world has been explored. On this episode of TechKnow, Phil Torres joins a team of scientists on a special expedition to explore and uncover the mysteries at the bottom of the ocean floor. "What we are doing is similar to astronauts and planetary scientists just trying to study life on another planet," says Beth Orcutt, a senior research scientist. The journey begins in Costa Rica aboard the R/V Atlantis, a research vessel operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. From there, Phil gets the chance to take a dive with Alvin, a deep-water submersible capable of taking explorers down to 6,000 metres (20,000 feet) under the sea. Commissioned in 1964, Alvin has a celebrated history, locating an une...

    published: 27 Dec 2015
  • Under Pressure: Deep Sea Minerals in the Pacific

    Several Pacific Island nations are eagerly eyeing up the potential economic benefits from valuable deep sea mineral resources that have been discovered within their maritime territories. With a recent surge in commercial interest the Pacific has now become the centre of an international debate over whether the sustainable economic benefits for Pacific Islanders will outweigh the environmental risks of harvesting these precious metals from the bottom of the sea. This short film examines the issue from a number of key perspectives including; anti-deep sea mining NGO's; politicians; government agencies; deep sea mining companies and; the Secretariat of the Pacific Community.

    published: 20 Jul 2013
  • Scientists fear deep-sea mining

    Scientists fear that even before one of the last frontiers of exploration, the ocean deep, has been properly studied it will already have been exploited by commercial deep-sea mining looking for rare euronews knowledge brings you a fresh mix of the world's most interesting know-hows, directly from space and sci-tech experts. Subscribe for your dose of space and sci-tech: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=euronewsknowledge Made by euronews, the most watched news channel in Europe.

    published: 06 Sep 2016
  • ENS351 Deep Sea Mining

    Description

    published: 06 Apr 2015
  • How a Canadian company will mine the sea bed near Papua New Guinea

    Canadian mining company Nautilus Minerals has reached an agreement with the government of Papua New Guinea to begin mining an area of seabed believed to be rich in gold and copper ores, according to the BBC. Under the terms of the agreement, Papua New Guinea will contribute $120 million to the operation and receive a 15 percent share in the mine. Environmentalists say the mine will devastate the area and cause long-lasting damage to the environment. The BBC reports that "the mine will target an area of hydrothermal vents where superheated, highly acidic water emerges from the seabed, where it encounters far colder and more alkaline seawater, forcing it to deposit high concentrations of minerals." The report continues: The result is that the seabed is formed of ores that are far ric...

    published: 07 Jun 2014
  • 12 Most Amazing Deep Water Facts

    The ocean is a deeply mystical , beautifully breathtaking, perfect place. But it does come with some downsides. Here are 12 Magnificent Deep Water Facts Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 5.Wow, That’s Hot Because the seafloor lies on top of the layer in the Earth’s crust where magma is made, certain parts of it contain hydrothermal vents. Such vents are a scientific result of lava erupting from the sea floor, and they are typically found near underwater volcanoes. These vents aren’t like those of your typical jacuzzi tub vents- they can reach temperatures up to six hundred and sixty two degrees high- enough to melt led. These could create problems for deep water explorers, but oceanographers are able to get an idea of where the vents are located through the hot water plumes tha...

    published: 12 Jun 2017
  • The Next Frontier in Mining: Deep Sea Exploitation in the Pacific

    The ocean has a wealth of resources. From food, to travel, to pharmaceutical needs, and to energy, the ocean has always provided for mankind. And now, mankind is turning to the ocean for minerals and metals needed for the technology we use in our everyday lives. An exploration into the emerging industry of deep sea mining leads to more questions than answers. Read more: http://pulitzercenter.org/projects/underwater-mining-pacific-ocean

    published: 14 Dec 2016
  • Deep Ocean Mining: The New Frontier

    http://www.kitco.com - David Heydon, Founder & Chairman of DeepGreen Resources, discusses the brave new world of deep ocean mining in international waters. Underwater mineral findings include copper, nickel, cobalt and manganese, and Heydon discusses both the efficiencies and difficulties of this new method of mining. For more exclusive PDAC coverage visit http://www.kitco.com/pdac Join the discussion @ the Kitco Forums - http://www.kitcomm.com Follow us on twitter @ http://www.twitter.com/kitconewsnow Connect w/ Kitco News on Facebook - http://on.fb.me/hr3FdK Send your feedback to newsfeedback@kitco.com http://www.kitco.com --- Agree? Disagree? Join the conversation @ The Kitco Forums and be part of the premier online community for precious metals investors: http://kitco...

    published: 18 Mar 2011
  • Most MYSTERIOUS Ocean Facts!

    Check out these top unexplained mysteries of the deep ocean. From strange sounds captured in the deep sea by hydrophones such as the bloop, the train, and julia, to gigantic whirlpools, biggest underwater falls and the milky bioluminescent sea phenomenon. Are deep sea monsters living deep in the ocean? Subscribe For New Videos! http://goo.gl/UIzLeB Watch our "12 Historical Treasures In The Middle East DESTROYED!" video here: https://youtu.be/Nt9mWUpTp1U Watch our "Most HAUNTED Places In The World!" video here: https://youtu.be/h9elrDhft9w Watch our "Most DANGEROUS Religious Cults Ever!" video here: https://youtu.be/VTD1qabI3v0 9. Underwater Falls Voted one of the most beautiful places on Earth, Mauritius is an island nation in the Indian Ocean. On the Southwestern tip of the island you...

    published: 05 Sep 2016
  • Destroying the Oceans, World’s First Deep Sea Mining Venture

    The world’s first deep-sea mining operation will kick off in early 2019 when a Canadian firm, Nautilus Minerals Inc., lowers a trio of massive remote-controlled mining robots to the floor of the Bismarck Sea off the coast of Papua New Guinea in pursuit of rich copper and gold reserves.

    published: 26 Mar 2017
  • Black Smokers: Ore Factories of the Deep

    BLACK SMOKERS: ORE FACTORIES OF THE DEEP At the bottom of the sea, in a depth of several thousand metres, black smokers bring up valuable raw materials from inside the earth. Their metre-high vents seem to give off smoke like under water industrial chimneys. CAMERA Maike Nicolai, GEOMAR Hannes Huusmann, GEOMAR ROV-Team, GEOMAR NARRATION Martin Heckmann GEOMAR | Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel

    published: 23 May 2012
  • Nautilus Animated Industrial.mp4

    Nautilus Animated Industrial that shows a sterilized version of the Deep Sea mining process.

    published: 01 Oct 2011
  • Exploration of Deep Sea Minerals

    published: 09 Jun 2017
  • Should we be mining the sea bed for minerals

    British scientists have announced what they are calling an "astonishing" discovery deep in the Atlantic Ocean. They found that an underwater mountain near the Canary Islands holds some of the richest deposits of rare minerals anywhere on Earth.

    published: 12 Apr 2017
  • UK firm in deep sea mining plan for minerals

    A British company has announced that it is planning to exploit a new and controversial frontier in the search for valuable minerals, by mining the sea bed in the Pacific Ocean. UK Seabed Resources, a subsidiary of the British arm of Lockheed Martin, hopes to extract so-called nodules - small lumps of rock - from the ocean floor. High prices for copper, gold and rare earth minerals, all vital for modern electronics, have triggered a rush to find new sources.

    published: 14 Mar 2013
  • 60 Minutes Highlights Importance of Rare Earth Elements

    On March 22, 2015, 60 Minutes featured a segment on the importance of rare earth elements and underscored the need to ensure a domestic supply chain of these critical minerals moving forward.

    published: 23 Mar 2015
TechKnow - Deep sea gold rush

TechKnow - Deep sea gold rush

  • Order:
  • Duration: 23:43
  • Updated: 27 Dec 2015
  • views: 15218
videos
Oceans cover 70 percent of the earth's surface, but only a fraction of the undersea world has been explored. On this episode of TechKnow, Phil Torres joins a team of scientists on a special expedition to explore and uncover the mysteries at the bottom of the ocean floor. "What we are doing is similar to astronauts and planetary scientists just trying to study life on another planet," says Beth Orcutt, a senior research scientist. The journey begins in Costa Rica aboard the R/V Atlantis, a research vessel operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. From there, Phil gets the chance to take a dive with Alvin, a deep-water submersible capable of taking explorers down to 6,000 metres (20,000 feet) under the sea. Commissioned in 1964, Alvin has a celebrated history, locating an unexploded hydrogen bomb off the coast of Spain and exploring the famous RMS Titanic in the 1980s. Alvin and its first female pilot, Cindy Van Dover, were the first to discover hydrothermal vents, which are underwater springs where plumes of black smoke and water pour out from underneath the earth's crust. The vents were inhabited by previously unknown organisms that thrived in the absence of sunlight. After 40 years of exploration, Alvin got a high-tech upgrade. The storied submersible is now outfitted with high-resolution cameras to provide a 245-degree viewing field and a robotic arm that scientists can use to pull samples of rock and ocean life to then study back on land. But scientists are not the only ones interested in the ocean. These days the new gold rush is not in the hills, it is in the deep sea. For thousands of years miners have been exploiting the earth in search of precious metals. As resources on dry land are depleted, now the search for new sources of metals and minerals is heading underwater. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's national ocean service estimates that there is more than $150tn in gold waiting to be mined from the floor of the world's oceans. "The industry is moving very, very fast. They have far more financial resources than the scientific community," says Cindy Van Dover, Alvin's first female pilot and Duke University Oceanography Professor. Seabed mining is still in the planning stages, but Nautilus Minerals, a Canadian mining company, says it has the technology and the contracts in place with the island nation of Papua New Guinea to start mining in its waters in about two years. What is the future of seabed mining? And what are the consequences of seabed mining for the marine ecosystems? Can science and industry co-exist and work together on viable and sustainable solutions? - Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check out our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
https://wn.com/Techknow_Deep_Sea_Gold_Rush
Under Pressure: Deep Sea Minerals in the Pacific

Under Pressure: Deep Sea Minerals in the Pacific

  • Order:
  • Duration: 24:57
  • Updated: 20 Jul 2013
  • views: 9953
videos
Several Pacific Island nations are eagerly eyeing up the potential economic benefits from valuable deep sea mineral resources that have been discovered within their maritime territories. With a recent surge in commercial interest the Pacific has now become the centre of an international debate over whether the sustainable economic benefits for Pacific Islanders will outweigh the environmental risks of harvesting these precious metals from the bottom of the sea. This short film examines the issue from a number of key perspectives including; anti-deep sea mining NGO's; politicians; government agencies; deep sea mining companies and; the Secretariat of the Pacific Community.
https://wn.com/Under_Pressure_Deep_Sea_Minerals_In_The_Pacific
Scientists fear deep-sea mining

Scientists fear deep-sea mining

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:01
  • Updated: 06 Sep 2016
  • views: 2919
videos
Scientists fear that even before one of the last frontiers of exploration, the ocean deep, has been properly studied it will already have been exploited by commercial deep-sea mining looking for rare euronews knowledge brings you a fresh mix of the world's most interesting know-hows, directly from space and sci-tech experts. Subscribe for your dose of space and sci-tech: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=euronewsknowledge Made by euronews, the most watched news channel in Europe.
https://wn.com/Scientists_Fear_Deep_Sea_Mining
ENS351 Deep Sea Mining

ENS351 Deep Sea Mining

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:06
  • Updated: 06 Apr 2015
  • views: 3405
videos https://wn.com/Ens351_Deep_Sea_Mining
How a Canadian company will mine the sea bed near Papua New Guinea

How a Canadian company will mine the sea bed near Papua New Guinea

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:12
  • Updated: 07 Jun 2014
  • views: 21229
videos
Canadian mining company Nautilus Minerals has reached an agreement with the government of Papua New Guinea to begin mining an area of seabed believed to be rich in gold and copper ores, according to the BBC. Under the terms of the agreement, Papua New Guinea will contribute $120 million to the operation and receive a 15 percent share in the mine. Environmentalists say the mine will devastate the area and cause long-lasting damage to the environment. The BBC reports that "the mine will target an area of hydrothermal vents where superheated, highly acidic water emerges from the seabed, where it encounters far colder and more alkaline seawater, forcing it to deposit high concentrations of minerals." The report continues: The result is that the seabed is formed of ores that are far richer in gold and copper than ores found on land. Mike Johnston, chief executive of Nautilus Minerals told the BBC "that a temperature probe left in place for 18 months was found to have 'high grade copper all over it'." Nautilus announced in April that it had completed its bulk cutter, the first component of its Seafloor Production Tools system, which will be used to mine the seabed. Nautilus also approximately 500,000 square kilometres of "highly prospective exploration acreage" in Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Fiji, Vanuatu and Tonga, as well as in international waters in the eastern Pacific, the company said in a press release.
https://wn.com/How_A_Canadian_Company_Will_Mine_The_Sea_Bed_Near_Papua_New_Guinea
12 Most Amazing Deep Water Facts

12 Most Amazing Deep Water Facts

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:46
  • Updated: 12 Jun 2017
  • views: 71585
videos
The ocean is a deeply mystical , beautifully breathtaking, perfect place. But it does come with some downsides. Here are 12 Magnificent Deep Water Facts Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 5.Wow, That’s Hot Because the seafloor lies on top of the layer in the Earth’s crust where magma is made, certain parts of it contain hydrothermal vents. Such vents are a scientific result of lava erupting from the sea floor, and they are typically found near underwater volcanoes. These vents aren’t like those of your typical jacuzzi tub vents- they can reach temperatures up to six hundred and sixty two degrees high- enough to melt led. These could create problems for deep water explorers, but oceanographers are able to get an idea of where the vents are located through the hot water plumes that arise into the sea. While it’s wondrous to think about these vents, it’s also fascinating to know that they play a part in keeping the ocean’s ecosystem healthy. The high temperatures of the water aid in removing chemical compounds from the water, like magnesium and sulfate. 4. Marine Mining An exciting type of robot has been developed in order to mine precious metals like gold, copper, manganese, and others from the bottom of the sea floor. There are both positive and negative effects to these seafloor mining robots, developed by Canadian Mining firm Nautilus Minerals. On the plus side, they could prevent us from continuing to deplete our natural resources and lead us to the development of more eco friendly technology. However, there is rising concern that they will disrupt ecosystems of the ocean. These things will definitely have no problem sinking to the ground, as they are reportedly 200 tons each and the size of a “small house”. Things like population growth have led analysts to believe that human society will have a vastly greater need for metals in future years, but environmentalists are fervently against it. Some scientists have even raised concerns that the mining vehicles may accidentally upturn dangerous deep sea floor sediments , and that harmful chemicals could end up in the waves of populated beaches. They aren’t set to launch until 2019, so if you are in favor or in protest, speak now or forever hold your peace! 3.Gold Rush Maybe the idea of mining at the bottom of the ocean isn’t such a bad idea after all. Research by the National Ocean Service may just hold more than twenty million tons of dissolved and undissolved gold. They added that if all the gold in the world’s oceans was successfully mined, every one would have nine whole pounds of gold. That seems pretty insane, but it may not be worth it. The gold is so diluted that for every litre of seawater, there is thirteen billionths of gold in it. Pretty tiny, wouldn’t you agree? Miners would have to travel two miles underwater, and on top of that, dig even deeper into the rocks of the ocean floor. 2.Embrace the Darkness Because the light of the sun can “only penetrate about three hundred thirty feet” into the surface of the ocean, much of the remains in total darkness. And, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, sunlight can only travel down as deep as six hundred feet. As a result, our twelve thousand and four hundred feet deep oceans are in a state of sort of terrifying darkness. As in, there are “definitely no light bulbs or candles to light down there darkness”. Which basically means that most of our planet is actually dark all of the time. One of the darkest zones of the ocean is the aphotic, of “midnight” zone. It lies only three thousand two hundred and eighty feet below sea level, which really doesn’t seem like that much, because it’s around equal to a sixth of a mile. We hope you’ve enjoyed- swimming- around in all this ocean knowledge, but we really enjoy your comments! Here are just a few from today. We’ll keep -fishing- for them…. 1.Watch Out For That Water The ocean is a deeply mystical , beautifully breathtaking, perfect place. But it does come with some downsides. Every year, tons and tons of human waste gets dumped into the ocean. Containments of this waste range anywhere from empty bottles to infected needles-ew! What’s more, is that cruise ships are responsible for dumping over one BILLION gallons of sewage into the ocean every year. The fact of the matter is, is that the ocean is FILLED with millions of disease causing microbes and bacteria. How much bacteria, may you ask? Er, just a tinge- if you consider 10 to 100 million viruses per teaspoon of ocean water a tinge. Although the ocean’s ecosystem has a natural way of cleansing itself, studies have shown more and more disease causing agents are in our Earth’s water. Such things can contaminate fish, which can eventually harm humans if consumed. The point is, we should all work to keep our oceans clean and safe!
https://wn.com/12_Most_Amazing_Deep_Water_Facts
The Next Frontier in Mining: Deep Sea Exploitation in the Pacific

The Next Frontier in Mining: Deep Sea Exploitation in the Pacific

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:45
  • Updated: 14 Dec 2016
  • views: 405
videos
The ocean has a wealth of resources. From food, to travel, to pharmaceutical needs, and to energy, the ocean has always provided for mankind. And now, mankind is turning to the ocean for minerals and metals needed for the technology we use in our everyday lives. An exploration into the emerging industry of deep sea mining leads to more questions than answers. Read more: http://pulitzercenter.org/projects/underwater-mining-pacific-ocean
https://wn.com/The_Next_Frontier_In_Mining_Deep_Sea_Exploitation_In_The_Pacific
Deep Ocean Mining: The New Frontier

Deep Ocean Mining: The New Frontier

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:29
  • Updated: 18 Mar 2011
  • views: 5757
videos
http://www.kitco.com - David Heydon, Founder & Chairman of DeepGreen Resources, discusses the brave new world of deep ocean mining in international waters. Underwater mineral findings include copper, nickel, cobalt and manganese, and Heydon discusses both the efficiencies and difficulties of this new method of mining. For more exclusive PDAC coverage visit http://www.kitco.com/pdac Join the discussion @ the Kitco Forums - http://www.kitcomm.com Follow us on twitter @ http://www.twitter.com/kitconewsnow Connect w/ Kitco News on Facebook - http://on.fb.me/hr3FdK Send your feedback to newsfeedback@kitco.com http://www.kitco.com --- Agree? Disagree? Join the conversation @ The Kitco Forums and be part of the premier online community for precious metals investors: http://kitcomm.com -- Or join the conversation on social media: @KitcoNewsNOW on Twitter: http://twitter.com/kitconews --- Kitco News on Facebook: http://facebook.com/kitconews
https://wn.com/Deep_Ocean_Mining_The_New_Frontier
Most MYSTERIOUS Ocean Facts!

Most MYSTERIOUS Ocean Facts!

  • Order:
  • Duration: 11:50
  • Updated: 05 Sep 2016
  • views: 3753893
videos
Check out these top unexplained mysteries of the deep ocean. From strange sounds captured in the deep sea by hydrophones such as the bloop, the train, and julia, to gigantic whirlpools, biggest underwater falls and the milky bioluminescent sea phenomenon. Are deep sea monsters living deep in the ocean? Subscribe For New Videos! http://goo.gl/UIzLeB Watch our "12 Historical Treasures In The Middle East DESTROYED!" video here: https://youtu.be/Nt9mWUpTp1U Watch our "Most HAUNTED Places In The World!" video here: https://youtu.be/h9elrDhft9w Watch our "Most DANGEROUS Religious Cults Ever!" video here: https://youtu.be/VTD1qabI3v0 9. Underwater Falls Voted one of the most beautiful places on Earth, Mauritius is an island nation in the Indian Ocean. On the Southwestern tip of the island you will find a fascinating illusion. When viewed from above, a runoff of sand and silt deposits creates the impression of an ‘underwater waterfall’. But did you know there are actually real underwater waterfalls? Seven waterfalls have been discovered deep underwater. The tallest waterfall on Earth is not Angel Falls, but an underwater waterfall called Denmark Strait Cataract located in the Atlantic ocean between Greenland and Iceland. It is the world's highest underwater waterfall, with water falling almost 11,500 feet and carries 175 million cubic feet of water per second. It is caused due to temperature differences in the water on either side of the strait. Cold water is denser than warm water. And the eastern side of the strait is a lot colder than the western side. So when the waters meet, the cold water sinks below the warmer water, creating a strong downward flow, which is considered a waterfall. And it's not just waterfalls that are under the ocean. There are huge secret rivers, complete with rapids and islands that flow down the sea shelves out into the desert plains creating river banks and flood plains. Here's a picture of the river Cenote Angelita under the sea of Mexico. These salty rivers carry sediments and minerals and could be vital in sustaining life. The world's sixth largest river, by volume, is below the Black Sea. It is 350 times larger than the Thames and 150 feet deep in places. 8. Milky Sea Phenomenon For over 400 years, sailors told tales of a mysterious event that takes place far out in the Indian Ocean. They would come across miles and miles of milky glowing waters, sometimes stretching as far as the eye could see. In 2005, a group of scientists led by Dr. Steven Miller of the Naval Research Laboratory in Monterey, Calif., decided to take a closer look at this story to see if it was true. They managed to register about 235 observations and get a satellite image that showed an area of low lighting in the Indian Ocean about the size of Connecticut. Their samples that they collected indicated the presence of a type of bioluminescent bacteria in the water, known as Vibrio harveyi. This isn't the same kind of bacteria that you might see in waves that use their bright light to ward off predators. This bioluminescent bacteria may actually use light to attract fish, since its favorite place to live is inside a fish's gut. Scientists' guess is that since they only emit a very faint light on their own, they have to gather together to make an impact. Their collective glow can grow to massive, milky sea proportions when their numbers swell to a huge amount -- think 40 billion trillion. They may also congregate to colonize algae. Sounds like a party! It is still only a guess since Dr. Miller and his colleagues haven't determined exactly what causes the bacteria to gather. 7. Unexplained sounds Of course dark, creepy fog can make you jump at anything that goes bump in the night. But what about things that go "bloop" in the sea? With names like "The Bloop," "Train" and "Julia," the sounds have been captured by hydrophones, or underwater microphones, monitored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The decidedly nonspooky nicknames for these sounds do little to dispel the mystery surrounding them. In 1997, NOAA hydrophones 3,000 miles apart picked up one of the loudest sounds ever recorded off the southern coast of South America: the Bloop (which sounds exactly like its name, a bloop). The Bloop mimics marine animal sounds in some ways, but if it were some kind of sea creature it would have to be almost the size of the Eiffel tower for that sound to be heard from 3,000 miles away. So what made the sound? It's anyone's guess but deep-sea monsters aside, NOAA holds the most likely explanation for The Bloop is that it was the sound of a large iceberg fracturing. Sure.... Another weird noise known as Julia sounds almost like someone whining or maybe even singing under water. The eastern equatorial Pacific autonomous array (the fancy name for the network of hydrophones) picked up this strange sound that lasted 15 seconds in 1999.
https://wn.com/Most_Mysterious_Ocean_Facts
Destroying the Oceans, World’s First Deep Sea Mining Venture

Destroying the Oceans, World’s First Deep Sea Mining Venture

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:13
  • Updated: 26 Mar 2017
  • views: 1866
videos
The world’s first deep-sea mining operation will kick off in early 2019 when a Canadian firm, Nautilus Minerals Inc., lowers a trio of massive remote-controlled mining robots to the floor of the Bismarck Sea off the coast of Papua New Guinea in pursuit of rich copper and gold reserves.
https://wn.com/Destroying_The_Oceans,_World’S_First_Deep_Sea_Mining_Venture
Black Smokers: Ore Factories of the Deep

Black Smokers: Ore Factories of the Deep

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:25
  • Updated: 23 May 2012
  • views: 27034
videos
BLACK SMOKERS: ORE FACTORIES OF THE DEEP At the bottom of the sea, in a depth of several thousand metres, black smokers bring up valuable raw materials from inside the earth. Their metre-high vents seem to give off smoke like under water industrial chimneys. CAMERA Maike Nicolai, GEOMAR Hannes Huusmann, GEOMAR ROV-Team, GEOMAR NARRATION Martin Heckmann GEOMAR | Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel
https://wn.com/Black_Smokers_Ore_Factories_Of_The_Deep
Nautilus Animated Industrial.mp4

Nautilus Animated Industrial.mp4

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:16
  • Updated: 01 Oct 2011
  • views: 22555
videos
Nautilus Animated Industrial that shows a sterilized version of the Deep Sea mining process.
https://wn.com/Nautilus_Animated_Industrial.Mp4
Exploration of Deep Sea Minerals

Exploration of Deep Sea Minerals

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:34
  • Updated: 09 Jun 2017
  • views: 20
videos
https://wn.com/Exploration_Of_Deep_Sea_Minerals
Should we be mining the sea bed for minerals

Should we be mining the sea bed for minerals

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:01
  • Updated: 12 Apr 2017
  • views: 52
videos
British scientists have announced what they are calling an "astonishing" discovery deep in the Atlantic Ocean. They found that an underwater mountain near the Canary Islands holds some of the richest deposits of rare minerals anywhere on Earth.
https://wn.com/Should_We_Be_Mining_The_Sea_Bed_For_Minerals
UK firm in deep sea mining plan for minerals

UK firm in deep sea mining plan for minerals

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:54
  • Updated: 14 Mar 2013
  • views: 1525
videos
A British company has announced that it is planning to exploit a new and controversial frontier in the search for valuable minerals, by mining the sea bed in the Pacific Ocean. UK Seabed Resources, a subsidiary of the British arm of Lockheed Martin, hopes to extract so-called nodules - small lumps of rock - from the ocean floor. High prices for copper, gold and rare earth minerals, all vital for modern electronics, have triggered a rush to find new sources.
https://wn.com/UK_Firm_In_Deep_Sea_Mining_Plan_For_Minerals
60 Minutes Highlights Importance of Rare Earth Elements

60 Minutes Highlights Importance of Rare Earth Elements

  • Order:
  • Duration: 12:55
  • Updated: 23 Mar 2015
  • views: 33570
videos
On March 22, 2015, 60 Minutes featured a segment on the importance of rare earth elements and underscored the need to ensure a domestic supply chain of these critical minerals moving forward.
https://wn.com/60_Minutes_Highlights_Importance_Of_Rare_Earth_Elements
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